The Saltbox roof is a popular style in the United States.

A saltbox style, with its long rear slope on the roof, is one of the most popular styles for storage sheds. Practical and easy to build, a saltbox provides plenty of room on a small footprint. This shed can be finished in many ways and looks spectacular in board and batten siding. 

The hipped roof is often considered the most attractive.

The hipped roof is similar to the gable style but the ends of the roof slope up to the ridge rather than being a vertical face. The hipped ends reduce the visual bulk of the shed and are an attractive architectural feature. The hip roof style is often used on summerhouses where roof storage is not a strong requirement; they can be slightly more complex to build than the gable roof, but well worth it.

The simplest design is lean-to roof or pent roof. 

This type of roof is a gentle slope to encouraging rain-water to run off. It is the simplest style, consisting of a single sloping plane with no hips, valleys, or ridges. A shed with single-slope roof is probably lowest in construction cost and easy to frame. These sheds are a great project for both novice builders and seasoned craftsmen.​

The Gambrel is often known as a colonial Dutch barn.

Barn roof is a gable roof with two slopes or pitches on each side. It's more complicated to frame, but it offers a lot more headroom and storage space than a gable roof. With barn shed design features simpler construction and an easy to construct roof line system.

The bonnet or kicked eaves type roof style is a porch shed.

A bonnet roof is a type of roof that is characterized by two slopes of a roof. It is essentially the opposite a mansard roof in that bottom slope is more angular than the top slope. The bottom slope often hangs over the storage shed to cover an open sided porch and provide extremely functional shelter from the sun or rain.

The gable roof is a style we are all familiar with. 

The gable is the simplest, consisting of two sloped planes meeting at the top or ridge in classic triangular shape. The end walls are extended upwards by two triangles called gable ends. It is relatively economical, especially for shorter spans where a simple rafter or truss can be used.

Storage shed roof styles

For better or worse, a storage building in your backyard is going to be somewhat of a focal point. It should either blend in with its surroundings. To blend in, you don't have to form your shed a miniature copy of your home, but you'll be able to complement details of your house with the proper selection of roof style, siding, paint colors and decorative details. 

Choose Your Perfect Backyard Garden Storage Shed